Date: August 12, 2018

Pastor Matthew Burt

Title: Esau: Don’t be that Guy (See to it- Part 3)

Text:

Date: August 12, 2018

Pastor Matthew Burt

Title: Esau: Don’t be that Guy (See to it- Part 3)

Text: Genesis 25:19-34; 26:34-36; Romans 9:1-18; Hebrews 12:16-17

 

SCRIPTURE: Genesis 25:19-34; 26:34-36; Romans 9:1-18; Hebrews 12:16-17

16 that no one is sexually immoral or unholy like Esau, who sold his birthright for a single meal. 17 For you know that afterward, when he desired to inherit the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no chance to repent, though he sought it with tears.

BIG IDEA: Esau: Don’t be that Guy (See to it- Part 3)

REVIEW:  

One of the things PB and Reg never tire of is to visit churches, especially in Europe. In Toulouse they had the opportunity to visit the Jacobean convent where the remains of St. Thomas Acquinas are located.  As soon as PB saw the bones and the light shining on them, PB thought of this quote: “God promises to forgive all who repent” …. This is actually attributed to St. Augustine of Hippo and there is a second part to the quote which we will consider later this morning..

We have looked at the 3 phrases that follow after the imperative of “see to it that”. This is actually a second person plural word and it means makes sure you all oversee, bishop each other. See to it that 1) No one misses the grace of God; 2) no root of bitterness springs up and 3) no one is like Esau.

 

  • No one misses the grace of God – this can be seen in 3 different ways. A) Connected to God’s discipline – He disciplines those He loves. It is so easy for us to see the discipline of God not as His grace but as judgement. We don’t resist His discipline. B) The gospel of God is that those who are called into the presence of God for forgiveness that they might be saved is a gift of God’s grace. Each and every time we hear the gospel call and we resist we miss His grace. C) In our everyday trials and troubles God promises to sustain us. He has never placed you in a situation that He has not also given you the grace and ability to live through that situation.
  • No root of bitterness grows up. Go back to the verses that say we are to seek to live at peace. We don’t seek vengeance. The warning is that when we have bitterness in our lives, we run the real risk of hurting other people just by the acidic poison of our attitudes. Anger feeds off of anger and spills onto others.  It causes trouble and defiles many. In Deuteronomy we hear “I will go after whatever god I want and nothing will happen to me”. The independent contractor, the one who has no supervisor is going to cause trouble.
  • None is like Esau – what was wrong with Esau –that’s what we seek to understand today

OUTLINE:

  • Look at the story
  • Look at the two different sins: sexually immoral or unholy
  • Heed this warning – ways to protect ourselves 

INTRODUCTION:

Profanity is more than the words we say. It is the life we live or the choices that we make.

Point 1: Look at the story: 

Isaac and Rebecca have been promised a child. But Rebecca and Isaac’s life is not as joyful as they hoped. They wait and wait and wait for 20 years with no child. There’s a great deal of sadness and even embarrassment in her barrenness. Isaac prays for his wife because he loves her and wants the shame to be removed from her. He wants a child. Isaac prayed as a man who believed the promise of God. God had said to his father – you will have a son. And God repeated the same promise to Isaac. Isaac teaches us something here that we dare not miss. Here is Isaac who hears the promise of God and sees it as an encouragement to pray.  One of the reasons we need to know God’s promises is so we can go to God and say here is what your word says.  So we read that she has not only one son; but two- twins.   They are an answer to prayer; the fulfillment of God’s promise with a prophecy – there are two nations of people – one will be stronger than the other and the older will serve the younger. And out they come. The first boy comes out – Esau – he’s red and he’s hairy. The other one comes and he has his hand on his brother’s heel.  The second one, Jacob, is very smooth.  He’s grabbing on as though saying you come back here I want to come out first. God determined their genetics, their personalities, their likes and their dislikes. We sometime struggle with those who God will save but we never struggle with God choosing personality and makeup.  God made these young boys the way they were. Isaac loved Esau more than Jacob- he was a man’s man. He was a rover.  Jacob stayed at home near the kitchen; more his Mom’s boy. One day Esau comes back from the fields and he has not eaten – he is famished. His eyes light on the stew that his brother is cooking. He is so overwhelmed by food that he doesn’t even know what he is asking for.  He comes in and says give me some of that red. He is caught up in what it looks like and he is caught up in filling his immediate desire. He strikes a deadly bargain with his brother. His brother says I will be glad to give you some of this red lentil soup but give me your birthright (your material inheritance and the right to your spiritual inheritance). Esau answers what good is my inheritance if I die.  He went away without serious reflection on the bad bargain he had made; he didn’t give the selling of his inheritance a second thought. Esau is for us an example of one who lives a profane lifestyle where profanity is more than words.

We come to Hebrews 12 and the author says don’t be like that guy.

Point 2: Two sins here: sexual immorality OR unholy

  1. Put off dealing with sexual immorality until next week. This is a serious offense in the eyes of God. Physical intimacy is only acceptable in the boundaries of a marriage between a man and woman – and that’s the only kind of marriage there is. The world of the New Testament is a world much like ours – saturated in sensuality. There was no escaping it in any arena of life. We see this same injunction in 1 Cor 6, Gal 5, Ephesian 5, Col 3, 1 Thessalonians 4.  This is nothing new in the book of Hebrews.

 

  1. This word that we use here- unholy- is a curious translation. A better translation might be a Greek word that means common, worthy to be trodden under; to be stepped on; to be despised. The idea is that the holy things of God are those things that have been separated from the common and used for special purposes. The unholy is that which is common. The word profane works here. The holy is separated out of the common byways of life. The idea is don’t be like Esau who thought that the holy things of God could be walked on and treated as if they were nothing. The dictionary says the definition of profane is that which treats that which is holy as common. It desecrates.  We think of not profaning the Sabbath day- keep it holy.  When the apostle Paul is arrested he is accused (Acts 24) of profaning the temple.  The court was only for Jewish men. Someone saw him in the holy place with an unclean gentile. They said he has profaned the temple. We use the word profanity in terms of our speech – originally it meant to take the Lords name and use it as a common name. How tragic and heartbreaking it is when you hear the holy name of Christ profaned. We also use profanity for other kinds of language – cursing.  We generally hear speaking their cursing against a human a being – profaning the beauty and treasure of God in the human person. Or to curse a situation is to profane the wisdom and love of God’s providence.

 

But how is it used with Esau? The birthright was more than just a physical and material inheritance. It was the right of the first born.  Esau as the first born was the one who was to be chosen of God to carry on the covenant of God. He comes in hungry and he gives up 2/3 of his father’s wealth but he also gives up his right to spiritual blessing. He treated it as nothing for the price of a bowl of red soup.

The warning is that you and I would not be that guy. We would not be those who would ever take what is holy, set apart, the priceless gift of God and treat it as if it were fine dust.

The sin of profanity is

  • giving up the important in exchange for the trivial.
  • giving up the irreplaceable for the easily replaceable
  • giving up the eternal for the present
  • giving up the unseen promised good of God in exchange for what is seen

Profanity is accepting Satan’s offer of something that appears good in exchange for God’s best.   We are reminded of what Paul says “eye has not seen etc.

The profane life says I am going to give that up for what I can see now. In Genesis 3 – Eve saw the fruit was good and desirable to eat and with one bite plunged the human race into darkness.

Think about Josiah 7– they go to Ai and they are chased away like little children. God’s judgement falls on Akin..  He says when I saw … I took. Or in Judges 14 – Samson sees a Philistine woman.  David sees Bathsheeba and took her.

I want to focus on what is unseen – I will not make that profane choice. It is so easy for us to choose the trivial in exchange for the real, the now for the later, the common for that which is irreplaceable.

Point 3:  What will we do to not be that guy – Esau?

  1. Strive with all your heart to know what is real and the inestimable value of what is real. PB looking at amber jewelry in Russia.  The first thing he thought of was that it just looked like plastic. It had no value to him because he had not seen it before. Stores would advertise leather looking vinyl…. Someday we will have vinyl looking leather!  Consider this: Genuine vegan leather!  We are so used the cheap that we give up the real. We need to study the Word of God so that it is worthy of our trust.
  2. We need to know the methods that the tempter uses to foist one of these bad choices upon us. Jacob helps us here. 1) He was pitiless.  He didn’t care anything of his brother’s plight. He saw his brother’s hunger as an opportunity to exploit his brother.  The soup was there – it should have been free for Esau!  He does not see himself as his brother’s keeper.  2) He was ruthless – he asked for the highest price possible – taking full advantage of his brother. This is the same thing the evangelist say about the selling of indulgences.  What kind of Pope would charge money for what he has the power to give freely. How unlike Jesus is. Do you ever see Jesus ask for money?  No – there’s a compassion. 3) Jacob was demanding. Satan does not care one wit about you. He does not want you to have any happiness in God. He will ask the highest price. Re-read the stories of those who sell there soul’s to Satan. Jacob says sell me your birthright NOW.  Think of Satan coming to the presence of God the second time in the book of Job.  He tries whatever he can and as often as he can. Satan comes to Jesus 3 times and Satan left him for a more opportune time – in the garden of Gethsemane.  He is pitiless and ruthless and he is demanding. Take this NOW!
  3. Learn the consequence of a profane lifestyle. There came a time when he desired to repent. But now here’s the 2nd part of the quote – “He never promises tomorrow in which to repent”. The consequences are serious. We need to know that we have no control over what it will bring into our life. You can’t say “I will be safe”. Treat every temptation from Satan with the same horror that we would treat a needle filled with heroin. It’s like signing a death warrant – you don’t get out alive. So why would I continue. God says the time for repentance is gone. This is a warning. Today is the day of salvation. Not tomorrow.. not next week!
  4. Consider Jesus. Esau made a bad choice. I have made bad choices. Jesus never did. Keep your eyes fixed on the the joy set before us.

 

CONCLUSION: What are you going to do today? What is your response today? Where am I given to profanity in my life?  Where am I living without concern for tomorrow? Where am I living where I disregard the important things?  Do you cherish the value of what God has given you? Do you see the treasure in Jesus Christ? Can you say Behold what manner of love the Father has given us that we might be called the children of God? Is heaven your hope and hell your horror? Have you taken things in your life that you should not have had and gotten up and walked away without another thought? Do you tremble?  Do you seek to repent but say one more day?  Choose today who you will serve!

SCRIPTURE: Genesis 25:19-34; 26:34-36; Romans 9:1-18; Hebrews 12:16-17 

16 that no one is sexually immoral or unholy like Esau, who sold his birthright for a single meal. 17 For you know that afterward, when he desired to inherit the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no chance to repent, though he sought it with tears.

BIG IDEA: Esau: Don’t be that Guy (See to it- Part 3)

REVIEW:  

One of the things PB and Reg never tire of is to visit churches, especially in Europe. In Toulouse they had the opportunity to visit the Jacobean convent where the remains of St. Thomas Acquinas are located.  As soon as PB saw the bones and the light shining on them, PB thought of this quote: “God promises to forgive all who repent” …. This is actually attributed to St. Augustine of Hippo and there is a second part to the quote which we will consider later this morning..

We have looked at the 3 phrases that follow after the imperative of “see to it that”. This is actually a second person plural word and it means makes sure you all oversee, bishop each other. See to it that 1) No one misses the grace of God; 2) no root of bitterness springs up and 3) no one is like Esau.

  • No one misses the grace of God – this can be seen in 3 different ways. A) Connected to God’s discipline – He disciplines those He loves. It is so easy for us to see the discipline of God not as His grace but as judgement. We don’t resist His discipline. B) The gospel of God is that those who are called into the presence of God for forgiveness that they might be saved is a gift of God’s grace. Each and every time we hear the gospel call and we resist we miss His grace. C) In our everyday trials and troubles God promises to sustain us. He has never placed you in a situation that He has not also given you the grace and ability to live through that situation.
  • No root of bitterness grows up. Go back to the verses that say we are to seek to live at peace. We don’t seek vengeance. The warning is that when we have bitterness in our lives, we run the real risk of hurting other people just by the acidic poison of our attitudes. Anger feeds off of anger and spills onto others.  It causes trouble and defiles many. In Deuteronomy we hear “I will go after whatever god I want and nothing will happen to me”. The independent contractor, the one who has no supervisor is going to cause trouble.
  • None is like Esau – what was wrong with Esau –that’s what we seek to understand today

 

OUTLINE:

  • Look at the story
  • Look at the two different sins: sexually immoral or unholy
  • Heed this warning – ways to protect ourselves 

INTRODUCTION:

Profanity is more than the words we say. It is the life we live or the choices that we make. 

Point 1: Look at the story:

Isaac and Rebecca have been promised a child. But Rebecca and Isaac’s life is not as joyful as they hoped. They wait and wait and wait for 20 years with no child. There’s a great deal of sadness and even embarrassment in her barrenness. Isaac prays for his wife because he loves her and wants the shame to be removed from her. He wants a child. Isaac prayed as a man who believed the promise of God. God had said to his father – you will have a son. And God repeated the same promise to Isaac. Isaac teaches us something here that we dare not miss. Here is Isaac who hears the promise of God and sees it as an encouragement to pray.  One of the reasons we need to know God’s promises is so we can go to God and say here is what your word says.  So we read that she has not only one son; but two- twins.   They are an answer to prayer; the fulfillment of God’s promise with a prophecy – there are two nations of people – one will be stronger than the other and the older will serve the younger. And out they come. The first boy comes out – Esau – he’s red and he’s hairy. The other one comes and he has his hand on his brother’s heel.  The second one, Jacob, is very smooth.  He’s grabbing on as though saying you come back here I want to come out first. God determined their genetics, their personalities, their likes and their dislikes. We sometime struggle with those who God will save but we never struggle with God choosing personality and makeup.  God made these young boys the way they were. Isaac loved Esau more than Jacob- he was a man’s man. He was a rover.  Jacob stayed at home near the kitchen; more his Mom’s boy. One day Esau comes back from the fields and he has not eaten – he is famished. His eyes light on the stew that his brother is cooking. He is so overwhelmed by food that he doesn’t even know what he is asking for.  He comes in and says give me some of that red. He is caught up in what it looks like and he is caught up in filling his immediate desire. He strikes a deadly bargain with his brother. His brother says I will be glad to give you some of this red lentil soup but give me your birthright (your material inheritance and the right to your spiritual inheritance). Esau answers what good is my inheritance if I die.  He went away without serious reflection on the bad bargain he had made; he didn’t give the selling of his inheritance a second thought. Esau is for us an example of one who lives a profane lifestyle where profanity is more than words.

We come to Hebrews 12 and the author says don’t be like that guy.

Point 2: Two sins here: sexual immorality OR unholy

  1. Put off dealing with sexual immorality until next week. This is a serious offense in the eyes of God. Physical intimacy is only acceptable in the boundaries of a marriage between a man and woman – and that’s the only kind of marriage there is. The world of the New Testament is a world much like ours – saturated in sensuality. There was no escaping it in any arena of life. We see this same injunction in 1 Cor 6, Gal 5, Ephesian 5, Col 3, 1 Thessalonians 4.  This is nothing new in the book of Hebrews.

 

  1. This word that we use here- unholy- is a curious translation. A better translation might be a Greek word that means common, worthy to be trodden under; to be stepped on; to be despised. The idea is that the holy things of God are those things that have been separated from the common and used for special purposes. The unholy is that which is common. The word profane works here. The holy is separated out of the common byways of life. The idea is don’t be like Esau who thought that the holy things of God could be walked on and treated as if they were nothing. The dictionary says the definition of profane is that which treats that which is holy as common. It desecrates.  We think of not profaning the Sabbath day- keep it holy.  When the apostle Paul is arrested he is accused (Acts 24) of profaning the temple.  The court was only for Jewish men. Someone saw him in the holy place with an unclean gentile. They said he has profaned the temple. We use the word profanity in terms of our speech – originally it meant to take the Lords name and use it as a common name. How tragic and heartbreaking it is when you hear the holy name of Christ profaned. We also use profanity for other kinds of language – cursing.  We generally hear speaking their cursing against a human a being – profaning the beauty and treasure of God in the human person. Or to curse a situation is to profane the wisdom and love of God’s providence.

 

But how is it used with Esau? The birthright was more than just a physical and material inheritance. It was the right of the first born.  Esau as the first born was the one who was to be chosen of God to carry on the covenant of God. He comes in hungry and he gives up 2/3 of his father’s wealth but he also gives up his right to spiritual blessing. He treated it as nothing for the price of a bowl of red soup.

The warning is that you and I would not be that guy. We would not be those who would ever take what is holy, set apart, the priceless gift of God and treat it as if it were fine dust.

The sin of profanity is

  • giving up the important in exchange for the trivial.
  • giving up the irreplaceable for the easily replaceable
  • giving up the eternal for the present
  • giving up the unseen promised good of God in exchange for what is seen

Profanity is accepting Satan’s offer of something that appears good in exchange for God’s best.   We are reminded of what Paul says “eye has not seen etc.

The profane life says I am going to give that up for what I can see now. In Genesis 3 – Eve saw the fruit was good and desirable to eat and with one bite plunged the human race into darkness.

Think about Josiah 7– they go to Ai and they are chased away like little children. God’s judgement falls on Akin..  He says when I saw … I took. Or in Judges 14 – Samson sees a Philistine woman.  David sees Bathsheeba and took her.

I want to focus on what is unseen – I will not make that profane choice. It is so easy for us to choose the trivial in exchange for the real, the now for the later, the common for that which is irreplaceable.

Point 3:  What will we do to not be that guy – Esau? 

  1. Strive with all your heart to know what is real and the inestimable value of what is real. PB looking at amber jewelry in Russia.  The first thing he thought of was that it just looked like plastic. It had no value to him because he had not seen it before. Stores would advertise leather looking vinyl…. Someday we will have vinyl looking leather!  Consider this: Genuine vegan leather!  We are so used the cheap that we give up the real. We need to study the Word of God so that it is worthy of our trust.
  2. We need to know the methods that the tempter uses to foist one of these bad choices upon us. Jacob helps us here. 1) He was pitiless.  He didn’t care anything of his brother’s plight. He saw his brother’s hunger as an opportunity to exploit his brother.  The soup was there – it should have been free for Esau!  He does not see himself as his brother’s keeper.  2) He was ruthless – he asked for the highest price possible – taking full advantage of his brother. This is the same thing the evangelist say about the selling of indulgences.  What kind of Pope would charge money for what he has the power to give freely. How unlike Jesus is. Do you ever see Jesus ask for money?  No – there’s a compassion. 3) Jacob was demanding. Satan does not care one wit about you. He does not want you to have any happiness in God. He will ask the highest price. Re-read the stories of those who sell there soul’s to Satan. Jacob says sell me your birthright NOW.  Think of Satan coming to the presence of God the second time in the book of Job.  He tries whatever he can and as often as he can. Satan comes to Jesus 3 times and Satan left him for a more opportune time – in the garden of Gethsemane.  He is pitiless and ruthless and he is demanding. Take this NOW!
  3. Learn the consequence of a profane lifestyle. There came a time when he desired to repent. But now here’s the 2nd part of the quote – “He never promises tomorrow in which to repent”. The consequences are serious. We need to know that we have no control over what it will bring into our life. You can’t say “I will be safe”. Treat every temptation from Satan with the same horror that we would treat a needle filled with heroin. It’s like signing a death warrant – you don’t get out alive. So why would I continue. God says the time for repentance is gone. This is a warning. Today is the day of salvation. Not tomorrow.. not next week!
  4. Consider Jesus. Esau made a bad choice. I have made bad choices. Jesus never did. Keep your eyes fixed on the the joy set before us.

 

CONCLUSION: What are you going to do today? What is your response today? Where am I given to profanity in my life?  Where am I living without concern for tomorrow? Where am I living where I disregard the important things?  Do you cherish the value of what God has given you? Do you see the treasure in Jesus Christ? Can you say Behold what manner of love the Father has given us that we might be called the children of God? Is heaven your hope and hell your horror? Have you taken things in your life that you should not have had and gotten up and walked away without another thought? Do you tremble?  Do you seek to repent but say one more day?  Choose today who you will serve!